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The Feasibility of Regional Food Systems in Metropolitan Areas:

An Investigation of Philadelphia's Foodshed

Peleg Kremera,* and Yda Schreuderb

http://dx.doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2012.022.005, pp. 171–191

 

Abstract

A rapidly globalizing food system raises important questions of environmental sustainability, food security, public health, and nutrition. The local food movement has been arguing for localization and regionalization of the food system as an effective strategy to counteract the risks of a globalized food system and promote sustainability. However, confusion abounds about what constitutes a local food system, and to date little evidence exists regarding the capacity of local food systems to support major metropolitan areas in the global North. This paper quantifies the ability of the Philadelphia region to support the dietary requirements of that city's population. Food production data for three foodshed scenarios in the Philadelphia region is analyzed and compared to the dietary requirements of the population based on federal dietary guidelines and current consumption patterns in the metropolitan region.

 

Keywords 
local food systems, regional food systems, foodshed, Philadelphia

 

Affiliations

a Center for Energy and Environmental Policy, University of Delaware.

 

Peleg Kremer is now at the Tishman Environment and Design Center, The New School

 

* Corresponding author: Peleg Kremer, Tishman Environment and Design Center, The New School, 72 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10011 USA; +1-212-229-5100 x3958; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

b Yda Schreuder, Professor, Department of Geography, and Senior Policy Fellow, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy, Department of Geography, University of Delaware, 216 Pearson Hall, Newark, DE 19716 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


 

 

 
 

Banner photos include a Cape Cod cranberry bog; a cranberry “screen house” used to grade fresh cranberries; farmland near Lake Placid, NY, in the Adirondack Mountains; Montmorency cherry trees on the Mission Peninsula of northern Michigan; the historic Round Barn in the South Mountain Apple Belt of Adams County, Pennsylvania; the “Sea of Grapes” district of the Lake Erie Concord Grape Belt, near Erie, Penn; a field of cabbages near Shortsville, NY, home to one of the world’s largest sauerkraut factories. All photos copyright by Duncan Hilchey.

 

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