Home Volume 1, Issue 4 Using a Supply Chain Analysis To Assess the Sustainability of Farm-to-Institution Programs

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Using a Supply Chain Analysis To Assess the Sustainability of Farm-to-Institution Programs

by Gail Feenstra1, Patricia Allen2, Shermain Hardesty3, Jeri Ohmart4, and Jan Perez2

http://dx.doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2011.014.009, pp. 69-84

 

Abstract

Interest in local and sustainable food among colleges and universities has risen considerably in the last decade. This study focuses on how to foster farm-to-institution programs by exploring barriers, opportunities, and potential solutions from different perspectives in the supply chain. We use a values-based supply chain approach to see what unique insights can be offered to people developing and maintaining these programs. Three research methods — a national survey of college students, a survey of institutional food service buyers in California, and in-depth interviews of people in the California distribution system, including farmers, distributors, and food service buyers — are used to collect data and perspectives from throughout the supply chain. Using the concepts from supply chain literature of product flows, financial flows, and information flows, we highlight key insights for various participants in the supply chain. Strengthening information flows and building relationships that allow all parties to build trust over time emerged as one of the most important elements in the success of these values-based supply chains. Educational institutions and the media can support these chains by becoming the vehicles for ongoing exchange of information among supply chain partners and the public.

 

Keywordsfarm-to-institution, local food, supply chain, sustainability, values-based supply chain

 

1 Corresponding author: Gail Feenstra, Agricultural Sustainability Institute/Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program, 1 Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 USA; +1-530-752-8408; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2 Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA

3 Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 1 Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

4 ASI/SAREP, 1 Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


 
 

Banner photos include a Cape Cod cranberry bog; a cranberry “screen house” used to grade fresh cranberries; farmland near Lake Placid, NY, in the Adirondack Mountains; Montmorency cherry trees on the Mission Peninsula of northern Michigan; the historic Round Barn in the South Mountain Apple Belt of Adams County, Pennsylvania; the “Sea of Grapes” district of the Lake Erie Concord Grape Belt, near Erie, Penn; a field of cabbages near Shortsville, NY, home to one of the world’s largest sauerkraut factories. All photos copyright by Duncan Hilchey.

 

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