Home Volume 1, Issue 4 Food Value Chain Development in Central New York: CNY Bounty

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Food Value Chain Development in Central New York: CNY Bounty

by Becca B. R. Jablonskia, Javier Perez-Burgosb, and Miguel I. Gómezc

http://dx.doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2011.014.015, pp. 129-141

 

Abstract

In the past 10 years, demand for locally grown food has increased dramatically. Concomitantly, small, commercial farms have declined disproportionately to small and large farms. The decline may be due to the lack of appropriately scaled marketing and distribution resulting from changing markets. This article presents a case study of a component of a food value chain started in 2007, Central New York (CNY) Bounty. CNY Bounty markets and distributes products produced by 119 small, commercial farms and processors to individual households, restaurants, natural food stores, and universities. In the past four years, CNY Bounty has experienced mixed success in terms of its economic viability, which can offer some important lessons for practitioners and contributions for food value chain research.

 

Keywordsagriculture of the middle, distribution, food hub, local food, New York agriculture, rural economic development, value chain

 

a Corresponding author: Becca B. R. Jablonski, PhD student, Department of City and Regional Planning, Cornell University, 314 West Sibley, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

b PhD student, Department of City and Regional Planning, Cornell University, 314 West Sibley, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

c Assistant Professor, Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, 246 Warren Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


 
 

Banner photos include a Cape Cod cranberry bog; a cranberry “screen house” used to grade fresh cranberries; farmland near Lake Placid, NY, in the Adirondack Mountains; Montmorency cherry trees on the Mission Peninsula of northern Michigan; the historic Round Barn in the South Mountain Apple Belt of Adams County, Pennsylvania; the “Sea of Grapes” district of the Lake Erie Concord Grape Belt, near Erie, Penn; a field of cabbages near Shortsville, NY, home to one of the world’s largest sauerkraut factories. All photos copyright by Duncan Hilchey.

 

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