Home Volume 1, Issue 4 Increasing Farm Income and Local Food Access: A Case Study of a Collaborative Aggregation, Marketing, and Distribution Strategy That Links Farmers to Markets

Content Visible to Subscribers Only

 

If you do not see a PDF on each article's webpage, you are not a subscriber to JAFSCD. (If you are a subscriber, please log in on the Home page to see the PDFs.) While the contents of the inaugural issue (volume 1, issue 1) are open to the public, the contents of issue 2 and beyond are provided for our subscribers only. Please subscribe to have access to this and any other JAFSCD content.

 

Some "Open Access Content" will be posted from time to time that is available to all viewers.

Not Ready To Subscribe Yet?


Sign up here to receive notification of new papers and other content we post. You won't be able to see full-text PDFs like subscribers can, but you'll be aware when new content is available.

Email*
 Prefix
 First Name
 Last Name
 Affiliation
 City
 State
 Country
  * = Required Field
 

Related Papers

Print E-mail

Increasing Farm Income and Local Food Access: A Case Study of a Collaborative Aggregation, Marketing, and Distribution Strategy That Links Farmers to Markets

by Michele C. Schmidta,*, Jane M. Kolodinskyb, Thomas P. DeSistoc, and Faye C. Conted

http://dx.doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2011.014.017, pp. 157-175

 

Abstract

As consumer interest in locally grown food increases, farmers and organizations are working on inventive ways to supply fresh and affordable local food to residents. The Intervale Center, a nonprofit in Burlington, Vermont, partnered with small and midscale farmers to create the Intervale Food Hub, a collaborative of staff and farmers that aggregates, markets, and distributes local products through both a multifarm community supported agriculture (CSA) program and wholesale. Informed by surveys conducted to assess supply and demand in the region, the Food Hub provides businesses, restaurants, retailers, institutions, and individuals with year-round access to a diverse mix of fresh and value-added local food. The Intervale Center serves as a local distributor, purchasing products from up to 30 farmers and coordinating packaging, marketing, distribution, and business operations. Year-round, shared space is available to conduct business operations, including packaging and short-term storage. After three years of operation, the Food Hub has begun exploring ownership structures and geographic expansion. Using a participatory action research approach, this case study reviews the enterprise's development and outcomes. We provide a qualitative assessment of farmer and staff perceptions of successful practices and limitations, and conclude with recommendations for future research.

 

Keywords: aggregation, collaborative, community supported agriculture, CSA, direct marketing, distributor, food system, participatory action research, social entrepreneurship, Vermont, wholesale
 

 

a,* Corresponding author: Center for Rural Studies, 206 Morrill Hall, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 USA; +1-802-656-0256; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

b Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, 202 Morrill Hall, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 USA; +1-802-656-4616; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

c Center for Rural Studies, 206 Morrill Hall, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 USA; +1-802-656-3021; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

d Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, 206 Morrill Hall, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 USA; +1-802-656-3021; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

case study, embeddedness, food distributor, food value chain, local food, Pennsylvania
 
 

Banner photos include a Cape Cod cranberry bog; a cranberry “screen house” used to grade fresh cranberries; farmland near Lake Placid, NY, in the Adirondack Mountains; Montmorency cherry trees on the Mission Peninsula of northern Michigan; the historic Round Barn in the South Mountain Apple Belt of Adams County, Pennsylvania; the “Sea of Grapes” district of the Lake Erie Concord Grape Belt, near Erie, Penn; a field of cabbages near Shortsville, NY, home to one of the world’s largest sauerkraut factories. All photos copyright by Duncan Hilchey.

 

Developed by  CyberSense.US