Home Volume 2, Issue 3 Building a Food Studies Program: On-the-Ground Reflections from Syracuse University
D.FSI.JAFSCD_Ad.15_p1b

Content Visible to Subscribers Only

 

If you do not see a PDF on each article's webpage, you are not a subscriber to JAFSCD. (If you are a subscriber, please log in on the Home page to see the PDFs.) While the contents of the inaugural issue (volume 1, issue 1) are open to the public, the contents of issue 2 and beyond are provided for our subscribers only. Please subscribe to have access to this and any other JAFSCD content.

 

Some "Open Access Content" will be posted from time to time that is available to all viewers.

Not Ready To Subscribe Yet?


Sign up here to receive notification of new papers and other content we post. You won't be able to see full-text PDFs like subscribers can, but you'll be aware when new content is available.

Email*
 Prefix
 First Name
 Last Name
 Affiliation
 City
 State
 Country
  * = Required Field
 
SU Food Studies Program
Print E-mail

 

Building a Food Studies Program: On-the-Ground Reflections from Syracuse University

by Evan Weissmana, Leigh Gantnerb, and Lutchmie Narinec

http://dx.doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2012.023.010, pp. 79–89

 

Abstract

Syracuse University (SU) is currently building a food studies program within the newly formed Department of Public Health, Food Studies, and Nutrition. In this essay we provide an overview of our experiences working to establish this food studies program at SU. We reflect on key issues that we struggle with and believe have resonance with and implications in the development of food studies as an academic discipline at other institutions. We briefly outline the emergence of food studies as a distinct area of scholarship, discuss both the opportunities and tensions food studies creates with established disciplines, provide background on the history of food studies at SU, discuss the process of curriculum development, explore the struggles to balance a liberal arts education with professional training, and conclude with some tentative lessons learned thus far in the process.

 

Keywords: dietetics, food studies, nutrition, program development, public health, social-ecological theory, Syracuse University

 

Affiliations

 Corresponding author: Assistant Professor of Food Studies, Department of Public Health, Food Studies, and Nutrition; Syracuse University; The David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics; 426 Ostrom Avenue; Syracuse, New York 13244-3240 USA; +1-315-443-4295; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

b Assistant Professor of Nutrition, Department of Public Health, Food Studies, and Nutrition; Syracuse University, The David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics; 426 Ostrom Avenue; Syracuse, New York 13244-3240 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

c Associate Professor of Public Health, Department of Public Health, Food Studies, and Nutrition; Syracuse University; The David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics; 426 Ostrom Avenue; Syracuse, New York 13244-3240 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 
 

Banner photos include a Cape Cod cranberry bog; a cranberry “screen house” used to grade fresh cranberries; farmland near Lake Placid, NY, in the Adirondack Mountains; Montmorency cherry trees on the Mission Peninsula of northern Michigan; the historic Round Barn in the South Mountain Apple Belt of Adams County, Pennsylvania; the “Sea of Grapes” district of the Lake Erie Concord Grape Belt, near Erie, Penn; a field of cabbages near Shortsville, NY, home to one of the world’s largest sauerkraut factories. All photos copyright by Duncan Hilchey.

 

Developed by  CyberSense.US