Home Volume 3, Issue 4 Researching Market and Supply-Chain Opportunities for Local Foods Systems: Setting Priorities and Identifying Linkages

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Researching Market and Supply-Chain Opportunities for Local Foods Systems: Setting Priorities and Identifying Linkages

by Dawn Thilmany,a,* David Conner,b Kynda Curtis,c Kathleen Liang,d Kranti Mulik,e Jeffrey O'Hara,e Martha Sullins,f and Tim Woods g

http://dx.doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2013.034.018, pp. 131–137

Published online August 29, 2013


Comment on this research commentary below!

 

Abstract

There is an increasing array of land-grant, nonprofit, and other academic programs intended to support the development of food system enterprises and programs. However, research to track consumers' evolving preferences and behaviors within these systems and to measure the intended policy outcomes of any public investments in these systems is lagging. This research commentary represents a compilation of opinions and insights from those who are interested in exploring research priorities for economic, marketing, and supply-chain aspects of local food systems. The priorities that emerge are framed in the following way: (1) opportunities for increased and more targeted research to help identify gaps in the literature; (2) areas where current localized research projects could be leveraged and scaled up to the national level; and (3) innovative projects and partnerships that are evolving to bridge both knowledge and systems gaps.

 

Keywordscommunity impacts, local foods, market access, market development, supply chains

a, * Corresponding author: Dawn Thilmany, Professor and Agribusiness Extension Economist, Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics, B325 Clark, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1172 USA; +1-970-491-7220; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

b David Conner, Assistant Professor, Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, University of Vermont, 205H Morrill Hall, 146 University Place, Burlington, Vermont 05405 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

c Kynda R. Curtis, Associate Professor, Department of Applied Economics, Utah State University, 4835 Old Main Hill, Logan, Utah 84322-4835 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

d Chyi-lyi (Kathleen) Liang, Professor, University of Vermont, Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, 103 C Morrill Hall, Burlington, Vermont 05405 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

e Kranti Mulik and Jeffrey K. O’Hara, Senior and Agricultural Economists, Union of Concerned Scientists, 1825 K Street, NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20006 USA; +1-202-331-6944, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

f Martha Sullins, Extension Regional Specialist, Colorado State University Extension, 1525 Blue Spruce Drive, Fort Collins, Colorado 80524-2004 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

g Tim Woods, Department of Agricultural Economics, 402 CE Barnhart, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40546 USA; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

This paper cited by:

Pereira, A. B. D., Brito, A. F., Townson, L. L., &  Townson, D. H. (2013). Assessing the research and education needs of the organic dairy industry in the northeastern United States. Journal of Dairy Science, 96(11), 7340–7348. http://dx.doi.org/10.3168/jds.2013-6690

 
 

Banner photos include a Cape Cod cranberry bog; a cranberry “screen house” used to grade fresh cranberries; farmland near Lake Placid, NY, in the Adirondack Mountains; Montmorency cherry trees on the Mission Peninsula of northern Michigan; the historic Round Barn in the South Mountain Apple Belt of Adams County, Pennsylvania; the “Sea of Grapes” district of the Lake Erie Concord Grape Belt, near Erie, Penn; a field of cabbages near Shortsville, NY, home to one of the world’s largest sauerkraut factories. All photos copyright by Duncan Hilchey.

 

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